Wedding Ministry

Whether you want something traditional or contemporary and creative, we are the right place for you! Our historic stone building, lovely landscaping, and beautiful sanctuary with cathedral-like arched ceiling and doorways offers a perfect place for picture taking at your destination wedding. We are located on a peninsula in Narragansett Bay with several picturesque places nearby to take pictures as well. At FCC we do perform and celebrate same-sex weddings. For any couple, if you are not a member at the time of your request for a wedding, all related fees come into play. Additionally, it will be most likely that a clergy person other than our staff will officiate the wedding if you are not members.

Please note that we can only accommodate destination weddings based upon the availability and at the discretion of our staff. If a date is agreed to several fees will come into play for those who are not members at the the time of the requested wedding date.  Outside clergy may be permitted in rare circumstances and through the approval of the Senior Pastor. The ministerial fee includes individualized premarital counseling, a rehearsal, and the wedding. This also may include attendance at the rehearsal dinner or the reception upon your request and the availability of the minister.

Feel free to download a copy of our brochure, which includes a list of fees and our information/application form. If you have any questions as you look at our brochure, please call our church office at 401-253-7288.

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Thoughtful Reflection on Weddings from Lillian Daniel, a UCC Minister in Illinois

10 Signs You Should Not Be Getting Married in a Church

John 2:1-2

“On the third day there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. Jesus also was invited to the wedding with his disciples.”

 

Reflection by Lillian Daniel

10 signs you should not be getting married in a church

1. You find yourself asking the clergy to take all the references to Jesus out of the service.

2. You find yourself dreading your next meeting with the minister.

3. You find yourself dreading the service, worried that the minister will say something too religious.

4. You disagree with the core values of the church.

5. You find the core values of the church so uninteresting that you can just tune them out, no problem.

6. You are not a member of any faith community and neither one of you intends to be.

7. This location feels like a choice you both are making for somebody else, rather than for yourselves.

8. You and your partner have never talked about religion, and you have serious doubts that you will ever be able to.

9. This experience feels like just another wedding transaction, one more service provider to check off the list.

10. You can’t wait for the reception.

 

10 signs you might be in the right place after all

1. You have drifted from the church, but as you prepare for your wedding you find yourself seeking a community of faith.

2. You enjoy meeting the minister and appreciate the chance to focus on matters of the spirit in the midst of wedding planning stress.

3. You have worshipped here and found yourself moved.

4. You want your marriage to be associated with this place and its core values.

5. You can imagine the members of this church holding you in prayer.

6. You sense that your marriage is about more than the two of you.

7. You find yourself praying.

8. This experience is causing you and your partner to talk about your faith and your aspirations for a faith community as a couple.

9. You don’t have it all figured out yet, but this church feels like a blessing to start you on your way.

10. You can’t wait for the wedding.

 

Prayer: 

May God bless all those who marry, wherever they may do so, that they will rejoice even more in love’s winter than in its springtime.

 

About the Author: 

Lillian Daniel is the senior minister of the First Congregational Church, UCC, Glen Ellyn, Illinois. She is the author, with Martin Copenhaver, of This Odd and Wondrous Calling: the Public and Private Lives of Two Ministers.